Why do i have mushrooms growing in my indoor plants



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Why do i have mushrooms growing in my indoor plants?

Answer:

Mycobacterium is an organism that thrives in the absence of oxygen. It is found almost everywhere on the earth’s surface. Mycobacterium grows on decaying organic materials, so it is often found growing in soils, compost, and manure. It can be harmless or harmful depending on the type of organism and how it is treated. When it grows in the soil, it can be helpful as a component of compost, and when it grows in the air, it can be harmful to human health. When its growth is controlled, it is usually helpful.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Examples of mycobacteria used for benign purposes include Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium phlei. Mycobacterium vaccae is a component of commercial “bovine” compost and has been shown to improve the quality of soil and help control plant diseases. Mycobacterium phlei is similar to Mycobacterium vaccae, but it is used in the biotechnology industry. Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium phlei are used successfully to improve the quality of soil and help control plant diseases.

However, certain strains of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are able to cause disease. Advances in biotechnology have led to their increased use in agriculture and other industries. The use of some strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as an ingredient in compost has raised concerns that it may be a source of the disease.

Consistent with its harmful nature, mycobacteria cause disease by invading and causing destruction of host cells.

Examples of Mycobacterium found in compost, manure, sewage, and irrigation water include Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium gordonae, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium marinum. Of these organisms, Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare is the most frequently encountered. The most common mycobacteria isolated from the environment are Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium kansasii. The most common organisms found in the environment that do not cause disease are Mycobacterium vaccae, Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium terrae, and Mycobacterium vaccae.

Mycobacteria are pathogenic because of their tendency to grow in the absence of oxygen, causing the host cell to lyse. This lysis allows the mycobacteria to invade and destroy the host cell. As a result, the average incubation period (the time it takes an organism to cause disease) of mycobacteria is 2 months. The incubation period is much shorter for organisms that are introduced by inanimate vector (for example, insects, soil, and water).

Below is a list of situations in which mycobacteria are commonly encountered. Although you may encounter other species, the most likely situations that you will encounter are as follows:

Mycobacterium has been found in compost generated from manure, sewage, and decaying organic matter.

Mycobacterium is often found growing in compost.

Mycobacterium can be found in compost.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium can be found growing in compost.

Mycobacterium is often found growing in compost.

Mycobacterium is often found growing in compost.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.

Mycobacterium grows in the absence of oxygen.



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